UTK Trainee Spotlight: Marissa McElrone & Marissa Black

This blog post highlights the work of two funded MCH trainees from the University of Tennessee, Marissa McElrone and Marissa Black. McElrone (left), a funded MCH trainee since January 2016, is a PhD candidate pursing her doctoral degree in Community Nutrition. Black (right) has been a funded MCH Nutrition Leadership, Education and Training Program trainee since January 2018, and is currently pursuing a Master’s in Public Health Nutrition.  This blog post discusses their trainee experiences providing cultural and linguistic competence workshops to Tennessee Title V Personnel. 

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Interactions that Make a Difference

Interactions that Make a Difference (ITMD) is a daylong cultural and linguistic competency workshopfacilitated by University of Tennessee MCH Nutrition faculty and funded trainees. ITMD workshops target Tennessee Title V Personnel from across the state focusing on enhancing personal cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills. Workshop are designed to accommodate 12-15 participants who have direct interaction with clients and individuals receiving services at health departments.

Marissa McElrone: As a funded trainee I have had numerous opportunities to enhance my own cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills. These experiences have enriched my passion for the subject and have even evolved into a focal point in my own research. Although my own work is incredibly rewarding, facilitating ITMD workshops across the state has allowed me to impact a much larger population. Front line staff have direct contact with various MCH populations on a daily basis. By providing cultural competency training to these individuals, ITMD has the power to improve access to culturally competent health care services for Tennessee’s MCH populations.

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Marissa McElrone facilitating the ITMD workshop for Mid Cumberland Regional Office.

Marissa Black: This summer, we traveled to the Mid Cumberland Regional Office to facilitate the ITMD workshop. As this was my first time facilitating an ITMD workshop, I was incredibly nervous! However, as the day went on and our participants began to open up about their experiences, I became more comfortable as well.

As an incoming Public Health Nutrition graduate student, I participated in a similar workshop. The cultural and linguistic competence training I received helped me understand the awareness, knowledge, and skills that are necessary to work in a cross-cultural environment. It was a great experience to use the knowledge I learned as a new student to help train Title V personnel. It was also rewarding to have important conversations about sensitive topics such as racism and stereotypes that people are often too afraid to talk about.

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