UTK Former Trainee Spotlight: Amber Ford

41863277_1627707123999886_4560250744220942336_nAmber Ford, an alumnus of the Maternal and Child Health Leadership traineeship, is a registered and licensed dietitian at the Knox County Health Department. At the University of Tennessee, Amber completed a dual Master’s program in Public Health and Public Health Nutrition, and completed the dietetic internship. As a Public Health Educator, Amber has focused on school health for the past three years.  

I completed the dual master’s program in public health and nutrition along with the dietetic internship through the University of Tennessee in December 2015. Serving as an MCH trainee was one of the biggest highlights of my time in the program, and the training and experience I received have been so valuable in my current position. I’ve worked as a Public Health Educator focused on school health at the Knox County Health Department for the past three years.

In my role, I specifically partner with Knox County Community Schools to help improve the health of students and families as it relates to nutrition and physical activity. The Community Schools initiative aims to use public schools as hubs for community resources to improve health and academic success. This involves working alongside teachers, students, and families to identify their specific needs and bringing in partners and resources to address these needs. We currently have 18 Community Schools in Knox County, and most of my work is aimed at creating and enhancing access to places for physical activity, promoting increased physical activity and physical education, creating supportive nutrition environments, and increasing access to healthy foods for students and families.

Throughout my time as a trainee, I had the opportunity to lead the cultural and linguistic competency workshops, Interactions that Make a Difference, for graduate students and frontline staff of health departments in East Tennessee. Countless times, I’ve used the skills I developed in presenting and leading trainings for diverse audiences, but I also use the cultural competency knowledge I gained on a daily basis. Our Community Schools are some of the most diverse and economically disadvantaged in our county, and the knowledge and skills provided by these trainings have improved my interactions with the students and families I serve and have helped me develop more culturally competent interventions.

Further, my time as a trainee equipped me with other skills for which I am consistently grateful. Working with a team to plan and implement the bi-annual Promoting Healthy Weight Colloquium improved my long-range planning skills, efficiency, and ability to delegate and recognize the strengths and weaknesses of others and myself. Assessment and evaluation of community needs and effectiveness of our interventions are important for sustained funding and effective utilization of limited resources, and I’m able to rely on the practices of regular evaluation and responding to evaluation outcomes used throughout my time as a trainee. All and all, I can’t say enough about how much serving as an MCH trainee impacted me and shaped the work I do. Well worth every minute!

 

UMN Trainee Spotlight: Noelle Yeo

IMG957309Noelle is a second-year MPH Nutrition student in the coordinated masters program and an MCH Nutrition trainee at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. She completed her bachelors of science at the University of Nebraska- Lincoln in nutrition, exercise, and health sciences in 2017 with minors in Spanish and business administration. After graduation in August 2019, Noelle plans to work in school nutrition. 

This summer I had the opportunity to complete one of my dietetic rotations at the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE) working with the School Nutrition Programs team. Over the course of ten weeks, I…

  • assisted with school nutrition program and summer feeding program reviews
  • learned about the USDA School Nutrition Program policies
  • created training materials for school food service directors and workers
  • worked on projects to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the school nutrition program review process
  • and much more!

One of my favorite projects was creating Visual Portion Size Guides for training food service workers on visually identifying portion sizes of fresh fruits and vegetables as students bring their trays through the lunch line. Many schools in Minnesota have begun implementing salad bars in cafeterias which is great for allowing students more choices and access to fresh fruits and vegetables. However, because students are serving themselves, it can be more challenging to determine if they have taken enough of a fruit or vegetable to meet the meal pattern requirements for a reimbursable meal. The nutrition consultants noticed this issue while visiting schools on reviews and wanted to create something to help.

After discussing with the team, we came up with the idea to take photographs of fresh fruits and vegetables on a school lunch tray in different portion sizes and create life-size photo cards. These cards could then be used for training to become more familiar with the various quantities or even be kept at the registers for reference. We selected common fruits and vegetables, purchased them, cleaned and chopped them, set-up the lighting, and took the photos. There was definitely a lot of questions from other MDE staff in the kitchen area and lots of snacks to pass around once we were done! The final product was cards of 9 fruits and 14 vegetables that showed portion sizes of ¼ cup, ½ cup, and ¾ cup of each.

At the end of the summer, I was able to attend the Minnesota School Nutrition Association annual conference in Rochester, Minnesota. We gave out samples of the visual portion size guides at the MDE booth during the expo and it was really exciting to talk to school food service directors. They all seemed really happy that this resource was available to help train their staff and were excited to use it. Now, the cards are available online on MDE’s website so anyone can print and use them.

Here are some examples of the  cards (not to scale):

grapes

carrot

Full versions can be found at:

Vegetables

https://education.mn.gov/mdeprod/idcplg?IdcService=GET_FILE&dDocName=MDE074461&RevisionSelectionMethod=latestReleased&Rendition=primary

Fruits

https://education.mn.gov/mdeprod/idcplg?IdcService=GET_FILE&dDocName=MDE074442&RevisionSelectionMethod=latestReleased&Rendition=primary

The Fate of Nutrition Research and the Dietary Guidelines: Is It Time for a National Institute of Nutrition?

The United States government continues to pour trillions of dollars into the treatment of lifestyle-related diseases while spending only a fraction on programs designed to improve health. Annual spending on nutrition research averages to only $1.5 billion annually, which may DSC_8252_FINAL.jpglike plenty but is almost nothing compared to the over $1 trillion in direct and indirect costs of diet-related diseases in the U.S. each year. To put it into an even smaller context, the U.S. also spends over $5 billion on marketing for candy products.

At the same time, the fate of the USDA’s 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which will aim to include nutrition needs for pregnant women and young children, hangs in the balance of unpredictable funding and competing industry interests. The Dietary Guidelines Committee is experiencing an onslaught of commentary from entities like the American Beverage Association and the Peanut Institute, who each wish to have their agendas addressed within the Guidelines. While outside funding certainly plays an important role in fueling national nutrition efforts, it is often insufficient and may also come at the cost of a balanced and neutral approach to national nutrition recommendations.

Of the 27 agencies within the National Institutes of Health, not one is focused primarily on nutrition or diet quality. While the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been at the forefront of all nutrition-related efforts within the federal agencies, its primary focus continues to be agricultural science and farming practices, and is influenced disproportionately by industry interests as a result. The lack of emphasis on the nutritional factors of health is helping to perpetuate the health consequences of poor diet and health disparities among communities prone to adverse dietary choices due to food insecurity and other socioeconomic factors.

Will a National Institute of Nutrition help to resolve these issues?

The call n for a National Institute of Nutrition and Food Health (NINFH) is spearheaded Dr. Joon Yun, a Salk Institute trustee and partner of a hedge fund who has helped fund millions of dollars into longevity science research. Dr. Yun argues that nutrition research should have a space to operate apart from agricultural research The NINFH would also be responsible for providing research-based, expert opinion to inform programs to improve nutrition and public health. Accomplishments that may be made by the NINFH include bridging the gap between diet and health outcomes, filling the funding gap for nutrition research and programs, keeping human nutrition science separate from agricultural science, and acting as a trusted authority for the public to seek information about optimal nutrition. Dr. Yoon suggests that the NINFH may be proposed in one of two ways: as an additional agency with the National Institutes of Health or as an independent entity, like the National Cancer Institute.

Plus, with the NINFH there is a chance that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans will no longer be in the hands of the USDA and may be more independently created in a more streamlined fashion. Implications for public health nutrition include better data and funding to support community programs like Head Start, WIC, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), providing better-quality nutrition support for communities in need.

What are your thoughts on a National Institute of Nutrition in the United States?

By: Emily Masek, ASU TRANSCEND Trainee

Emily is a first-year Master’s degree student and dietetic intern at Arizona State University’s College of Health Solutions. She began her nutrition studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, earning a Bachelor’s in nutrition sciences with a minor in kinesiology, and has helped publish two papers about the role of dietary polyphenols in inflammatory diseases. Her current thesis research will involve a pilot study about the effects of a parenting education intervention on the diet quality of Hispanic and Latino adolescents in Phoenix, Arizona.

Sources:

  1. https://www.ucsusa.org/our-work/food-agriculture/solutions/expand-healthy-food-access/why-we-need-national-food-policy#.W9hMzC-ZOgR
  2. https://thehill.com/opinion/healthcare/410620-the-case-for-a-national-institute-of-nutrition
  3. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/donor-to-longevity-science-advocates-for-establishing-a-national-institute-of-nutrition-300674383.html